The Rise of Technology

As part of my #2017readingchallenge I finally have to read a lot of the non fiction that’s been sitting on my shelf forever. I do enjoy non fiction and learning new things, but they just take so long to read!! My patience level is too low for that. 

There are three central non-fiction sub genres on my shelf: WWII, religion (all of them not just one), and technology.

I’ll do a separate post about my love of WWII and religion, because those take quite a bit of explaining, but for now let’s focus on technology. 

Now I don’t know about you, but I am 25 years old and was born during the true rise of technology. In my elementary school I think we had two computers for student use, and we had one at home (that used AOL so it was so slow!!!). It was the time of floppy disks, where you needed an entire stack of them to hold on your school assignments.

And then to my child brain, everything seemed to change overnight. Suddenly there are iPods, laptops, USB drives held more than all my floppys combined, and social media became a huge part of our lives. Insanity!!!

But it’s crazy to realize that this rise of technology was over 100 years in the making. Right now I’m reading The Innovators: How a Group of Hackers, Geniuses, and Geeks Created the Digital Revolution by Walter Issacson. (Walter Issacson is an amazing biographer, and I cannot wait to read more of his work.)

But according to Walter Issacson, the invention of the computer and the technological revolution dates back to the 1800’s!!! Long before we had proper calculators Ada Lovelace and Charles Baggage were working on a computing machine. But the truly amazing this is Ada Lovelace basically envisioned the modern day computer and is considered to be the first computer programmer. This is a woman who died in 1852. The first computer programmer died more than 100 years before Steve Jobs was even born!!!

The number of women we can attribute to the technology reveloution is outstanding. Here’s a few of my favorites: 

  • Grace Hopper – this woman is truly badass and I don’t think we’d have all that we do without her. She was a rear  admiral in the Navy and a mathematician. As one of the first computer programmers she invented one of the first compiler tools and popularized machine program languages. Also in 1967 at the age of 61 and again in 72 at 66, she was recalled to active duty. At the time of her retirement she was the oldest active-duty officer in the Navy, at f***ing 79 years old.
  • Jean Jennings Bartik – Jean Bartik and the other ladies she worked with under Grace Hopper, were one of the first teams of computer programmers. Now as I understand it, the women were given this job because it was believed (wrongly) that the programming wasn’t as important as the hardware the men were working on. These women developed subroutines, nesting, and pretty much laid the groundwork for modern programmers. And they didn’t get any damn credit. 
  • Ada Lovelace – mentioned her already but she’s pretty damn impressive. Ada had a beautiful mind, part romantic and part logical, I believe she was born in the wrong time. Her ideas and plans for the future were so beyond her time and so remarkable for a woman of her time that I just can’t even believe she exists.

Fun fact: the terms bugging//debugging are literally named from a bug. 

As I continue on my technology non fiction tour I’ll add more. But until then I’ll be learning more about computers the size of my living room.

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Books And Bullets

Reading is and always will be, my number one past time. There’s just something incredible about the number of unique stories we are capable of creating, the number of intricate worlds and characters there are. Books can help us through rough times, they can provide comfort, cure boredom, expand minds, in short, books are awesome!!!

Earlier this year when I ventured into Half Price Books I realized, I don’t actually need anymore books. My bookshelves are overflowing and there are so many that I’ve never even opened!! For instance, The Hobbit has been sitting, wrapped in packaging, for almost 10 years!!! I resolved to stop buying books and read every damn book in my home. (After all the books I bought that day of course).

Bullet Journaling has been one of the greatest, unexpected, resources for this task. First up we have my bookshelves with all my unread books. I love these because watching them get filled up and colored in gives a sense of accomplishment. I think visual accomplishments are just as important as check-box-lists. Plus it’s just fun to make!

Next up we have my detailed reading list.

This one I made recently just to hold myself more accountable. I listed all the books I still have to read and divided them into three color coded categories: easy-read, moderate, and long-read. I also have the page length listed, book genres, and a generalization of the different genres on the bottom. 

There’s also a spot for the start and end dates, a check box when done, and a spot for my rating. I love these pages because it makes it easier for me to plan ahead and remember how I liked certain novels for future recommendations. This page is helping me so much in deciding what to read and when, especially since some of them are ridiculously long and I have to make sure I have the appropriate time before starting!

Lastly we have my wishlist. These are all the bosom I can’t wait to buy after I finish my reading challenge!!! It’s going to be an expensive week.

I’m thinking of adding a savings log for my wishlist, so that I can set aside some money now for a giant book shopping spree!📚📚

Any suggestings to add to my list? How do you track your reading habits?? I’d love to see!!